Just out

From the Garden, Life Captured: Every Day Observations, Photo Challenges

 

Dogday Cicada emerging from its exoskeleton

Dogday Cicada emerging from its exoskeleton                                       f/5.0 1/400, ISO 560, 35mm

I spend quite a lot of time photographing in our garden throughout the spring and summer. Let me first say, I have ALWAYS been creeped out by bugs. But if you spend enough time in a vegetable garden, you’re likely to encounter quiet a few.  So, while keeping a safe camera lens distance from them, I like to capture their images and I research what I found.

I  was astonished to catch this moment.  It’s a Dogday cicada just coming out of its nymph shell.  

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Complementing Purple

Photo Challenges
Basket of Colored Easter Eggs in purple shredded cellophane

Basket of Easter Eggs                                                                 f/6.3, 1/60s, ISO 450, 35mm

My selection for this week’s CFFC challenge featuring the color purple brings me to a consideration of color theory and the color wheel.  I think the complementary color of the table (yellow) makes the purples in this basket ‘pop’.

Did you know that Sir Isaac Newton, the 17th Century English physicist and mathematician, was also the inventor of the color wheel?  I didn’t.

Sure, I remember the story about an apple falling from a tree which led Newton to “discover” gravity.  I leave it to Steve Connor of the UK Independent  to detail the veracity of the anecdote.  But there’s so much more about the scientist I didn’t know.

For instance, according to biographers, Newton was born into a farming family on what was Christmas Day 1642, just three months after his father died.  His mother remarried two years later, but the young boy was sent to live with his grandparents and felt orphaned.  His early school reports described him as ‘idle’ and ‘inattentive’.   Apparently, however, a grammar school headmaster perceived his talent and encouraged him to remain in school. Eventually he entered Trinity College Cambridge, with the aim of earning a law degree.  After being introduced to philosophy and the mechanics of astronomy and optics, he later settled on the study of mathematics.

In 1665, a  terrible recurrence of Bubonic Plague spread across London, killing 15% of the population and closing the University until 1667.  Newton, just 25 years old, went home to Lincolnshire. In the next two years, his independent studies led him to extraordinary advances in mathematics, optics, physics and astronomy.

It was during this period that he argued that white light is really a mixture of many different types of rays, each producing a different spectral color.  He arranged the colors in a wheel, primaries (red, yellow and blue) opposite their complementaries (green, purple and orange)–demonstrating each complementary enhances the other’s effect through optical contrast.

If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.                                                        – Sir Isaac Newton

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Bird in the hand

Latest Pix, Photo Challenges
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Fledgling Robin                                                                                       f6.3, 1/60s, ISO 280, 35mm

This fledgling robin was found out of its nest in a Greenville, SC neighborhood.  A fledgling bird is about two weeks old, fully feathered and able to grip a finger or perch.

The homeowner was mowing when she noticed the young bird in the grass.  Nearby, she could hear the call of the adult robins.  After this brief photo-op, the chick was carefully placed out of the reach of curious cats, where it’s parents could continue to feed it.   Within a couple of weeks, the youngster flew off to roost with the other robins.

According to an article by the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, the homeowner did exactly the right thing. Often young birds are mistaken for orphans and humans try to save them, but it’s really better to simply place them out of harms way. I’m just glad I was there to capture the moment for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge, Feathers.

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Cee’s Black and White Challenge: Food

From the Garden, Photo Challenges

Sweet Georgia Onions

While working on a project to document the process and progress of our urban container garden when I came upon this challenge from Cee’s Photography.  The challenge is to capture a food item in black and white.  Like many photographers, there was time when I only shot film, and primarily black and white film.  Today, I’m shooting RAW with Nikon D5100; Nikkor lens: 35mm 1:1.8. There are many ways to convert a color digital image to black and white. I converted this image by completely reducing the saturation of the RAW file before importing into Ps Elements.

The image depicts the ‘first fruits’ of our Bonnie Plants Sweet Georgia Onions harvested on May 7.  We planted 24 onion ‘starts’ on in one Earth Box on February 22. The Earth Box is a 29″ L x 11″ H x14″ W/D plastic planter invented by Blake Whisenant, which uses a ‘bottoms up’ watering method. The yield ranges from golf to tennis ball-sized onions. While they are ready to eat right now, most will cure for about a week while the papery outer skins dry, the roots shrivel and the green necks begin to dry.   They can keep for weeks, but it’s not likely they’ll be around that long–deeelish!

Thanks for another good challenge, Cee!